When tigers play the game

25 06 2014

Photographing wildlife usually involves a lot of patience, and a lot of frustration.  This is normally the case, but sometimes it all comes together and you find yourself in the right place at the right time.  This is what happened when I was hosting a photographic safari in India.

Photographing tigers is a tricky business; they are designed to not be seen, which always makes things a little interesting. The next part of the challenge is finding a tiger that is happy to be photographed and comes and sits right out in the open.  Given the dense jungles of India, this doesn’t happen very often, but we have managed to find a place where the tigers are quite at ease in the open meaning they can be found with some regularity, giving us good shot.  On my recent photographic safari, we managed to find a large male, who was playing the game.  We found him lying down in a dried up river bed, quite a distance away from us, and decided to wait with him to see if he came any closer.  A solid two and a half hours later, he did just that, and let me tell you, it was worth the wait!  He approached us directly giving us great head-on photos, before moving past us while stalking a spotted deer.  He then made his way, very casually, to a small water hole where he stopped for a late afternoon drink before flopping down into the water to cool off.  Needless to say, the cameras were clicking away furiously!  It was photographic heaven.

I will be leading the Tiger Safari again next year, and cannot wait to see if we can see more of the same from these enormous cats!

To join us on safari, click here!





A taste of India

9 05 2013

The mysterious sub-continent of India has a lot to offer wildlife photographers, but like many, I went there really only hoping to see one thing – the magnificent Bengal tiger!  I was living out my dream to see one of these awesome predators recently on a photographic safari, and had more luck than I could have ever expected.

 

Things started off slowly with no tiger action on the first two drives, but they did give us a glimpse of the extreme beauty that the Indian landscape has to offer.  Wild peacocks, jungle fowl and treepie’s were out in full force adding colour to the bush that was drying up in the anticipation of summer.  Spotted deer (the tiger’s most common prey) and the unusual looking barking deer would pop up from time to time, giving our cameras practice runs for when they were aimed at the prized target.  The real excitement of the first two safaris however, was the anticipation of seeing a wild tiger. We searched through the thick forest vegetation, finding nothing but tracks (which were photographed of course); we waited at the popular waterholes with only the playful langur monkeys coming down to greet us; we would even stop and listen at random intervals for sounds that a tiger was near – all very exciting stuff.  As much as I enjoy the anticipation of seeing a tiger, it was dwarfed by the excitement, on our third drive, when we heard the gruff call of a tigress nearby.  The engines started up, and we raced off in the direction of that beautiful sound.  Two minutes later, I was clicking away furiously as my first wild tigress walked straight towards us.  We must have looked ridiculous – a vehicle where only smiles and cameras could be seen!  It was a truly fantastic sensation to be in the presence of such a marvelous animal.

 

We had the privilege of seeing six different tigers during the photo safari, all of which were relaxed with vehicle and very obliging to the cameras.

I have added a short video from the safari below, have a look and let me know what you think!

To join me on safari, click here!