Good light and good times

30 09 2014

So often on safari you find yourself in the most glorious afternoon or morning light with no animals to photograph. The opposite also applies, where you find yourself with a leopard, tiger or any other animal for that matter, and the light is horrible. Only on a few occasions, do all the right variables come together and produce a magical sighting!

We were on a photographic safari recently, and had the good fortune of spending a couple afternoons with a small family of cheetah. The mother and three eighteen month-old cubs were on the move, looking for something to chase. The mother had a different agenda to her three boys. She had the unenviable job of trying to feed four large cheetahs, while the young lads were just keen to chase anything, and try their luck at hunting. They had caught and killed their own prey before, but that must have been luck, because from the chases that we saw it didn’t look like they knew their trade very well.   The family spotted a herd of wildebeest and zebra at the far end of an open area – perfect terrain, but not perfect prey. The zebras were way too large, even if all four cheetahs pooled their efforts, so they were out the game. All except two of the wildebeest were fully-grown, also effectively taking them out of the question. The only real options for the hungry cheetahs were the two sub adult wildebeest hanging around the edges of the herd. All four cheetahs were stealthily moving in, when two of the young males started chasing each other. The mother sat down patiently, and waited for them to finish their game of tag. Eventually, they remembered what they doing, and re-focused on the matter at hand. They covered the distance between themselves and their quarry with ease, almost fooling us into thinking they were on the right track when all three just burst with excitement and ran at the herd. They had no real plan, they just ran. They chased the confused wildebeest all over the clearing, in all directions. As embarrassing as their attempt was, it was wonderful for photography, because for around ten minutes (a cheetah chase usually only last about 10 seconds if you are lucky) we had three cheetah chasing wildebeest around, in the open, in the afternoon sun! The shutters went crazy trying to pick up as much of the action as possible – this was camera heaven!

They came nowhere close to actually catching any of the wildebeest, but they would have learnt a few hunting lessons, number one being patience.

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Every time is playtime

26 11 2013

One of the joys of being young is having endless energy; another perk is that you have no responsibility, so every time is playtime.  Now take that thought, and add some seriously cute little lion cubs and you get an amazing sighting!

I was in Kenya recently leading a photographic safari, when we came across a family of lions – a female with her three small cubs, probably around three months old.  It was late in the afternoon, and they had finished chewing an old warthog carcass they had found.  The cubs decided this was a great time for a bit of rough and tumble, and so the games began.  They were darting back and forth, stalking and jumping on each other, biting their sibling’s ears until said sibling didn’t find it funny any more and a real little scuffle broke out.  Peace was restored time and again when another of the siblings found a stick to play with, and this became the most sought after possession, which would leave us photographing a line of cubs, all chasing the leader with the prized stick.

The mother, who had been keeping a watchful eye over the young bundles of fluff, was not excused from their list of play items, and it was not long before one of the cubs took on something a little larger than itself.  Her patience was commendable as she let her youngsters try to ‘hunt’ her.  They jumped all over her, attacking her tail, ears, face and paws, until eventually she started giving them a bath, which was when they returned to the magic stick that had once again been discovered (cue small line of lions following a stick).

It is not often that you are allowed into the world of such great predators, so when you get the chance, I highly recommend keeping your camera ready!

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Svalbard: Arctic cuteness

5 08 2013

One of the species I was really hoping to see on this safari was the arctic fox.  I have been to the arctic twice before, but these little beauties have eluded me on both occasions.  I figured that at this time of year they would not be wearing their (more well known) all white uniform, but would be in what is known as the blue phase, or their summer outfit, which would give me a better chance to spot one (the white fur on white snow makes spotting them in winter a tricky business). 

 

We checked a few areas where the foxes are seen regularly, but to no avail.  It seemed that this was going to be a species that would laugh at me from its secret hiding spot for a third consecutive visit to the cold north, until the second last day.  At around four thirty in the morning (remember the midnight sun – we started out at one thirty) we found our first fox – an extremely nervous individual that ran like an arctic blizzard, giving us only a quick look at over one hundred meters.  Not great, but it counted (I did manage to grab a photograph of the fox, but even with all the equipment in the world, let’s be fair, it was a long, long way away).  It put a smile on my face and a tick on my list, but being a photographer, I (as always) hoped for a second opportunity.

 

After a solid midday sleep, we set out again on a final attempt to find some foxes, and boy did we strike gold!  Twenty minutes into the search, we had a quick glimpse of a fox on a small ledge above us.  We slowly followed, and had been led to a den site.  The female fox had moved up over some rocks, and while we were scanning the area, three small balls of fluff started rolling around in the afternoon sun.  Fantastic!  I could hardly believe our luck, but left the disbelief for later, because I was concentrating through twelve frames per second.  The three little foxes were an estimated twenty days old, which is just old enough to be ignorantly playful, but young enough to be absolutely cute.  We were lucky enough to spend close to three hours with the little foxes, and got the images I was hoping to get.

 

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Two little bits of fun

9 10 2012

A young baboon’s first step out into the big bad world can be daunting, but with a sibling on hand to try it out with, it can only be fun.  I was out on an afternoon safari, and found a troop of baboons, finishing up their day.  Between all the flea picking and playful teenagers, were two fresh-out-the-oven babies, exploring their playground for the first time.

Once they had broken free from their mother’s protective grip, they headed straight for an old, dead log and began climbing it.  I use the term climbing loosely, as they battled their way to the middle.  The climbing quickly evolved to trying to push the other one off the branch, which lead to shrieks of fear and delight – all very entertaining for the photographers that were present!  At one point, the braver of the two tried his hand at a live tree, and made it all of thirty centimetres off the floor – his more timid companion stood in awe!  I spent a magic forty-five minutes clicking away at the babies, as they tried to figure it all out.

From time to time, the mothers would pop their heads into the little explorers club, just to make sure everything was still OK, only to be met with blatant rejection, as the now cool young guns continued up to the middle of the big old branch.

The time did come though when they were all played out (meaning they were hungry), and went scuttling back to their mothers for milk.  Firmly attached to their mother’s belly, they were escorted back to the troops roost for the night.

 

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