Svalbard: 100% character

8 08 2013

There is so much natural beauty on the island archipelago of Svalbard that there was bound to be one species that dropped the ball, so to speak.  There is no denying that the mighty walrus is not an outright looker, but what they lack in aesthetics, they make up for with loads of character.

Naively, before seeing my first walrus, I thought of them as a juicy prey item for the largest predator on earth – the polar bear.  Split seconds after seeing my first walrus, I realized just how wrong I was!  It was never in doubt that they were big creatures, but I was really surprised by just how big they actually are.  The average size of a male is around one thousand two hundred and fifty kilograms (about two thousand seven hundred and sixty pounds), and the average length is just over three meters (ten feet).  Those nifty stats simply mean that if they are bothered by a polar bear, or anything else for that matter, they don’t actually have to do anything, they just stand together and hold their ground.  We did actually see some interaction between a polar bear and a herd of female walruses, which came to naught as soon as the wary mothers had (rather roughly) escorted their young to the safety of the water.

We had a number of good encounters with walrus on the safari, each one leading to some pretty decent photo opportunities.  Getting up close to the walrus was not a challenge.  The first encounter we had, they came up to us (wildlife photography made easy).  We were still sorting out cameras and approaches on the beach when a couple of the bigger lads came to see what we were all about.  The way they pop their heads up out of the water and inspect you is very cool, even gentlemanly.  Once they were comfortable with us, they stopped the bobbing up and down, and just had a good look.  It was a great opportunity to get some detail-revealing portraits.  On our second encounter, we crept slowly and quietly up to a large herd of mature males that were sleeping on the beach.  They were sleeping with conviction, so it was not difficult to get within fifteen meters.  The sounds emanating from the herd combined with the sheer volume of snot and drool didn’t help their case, but what fantastic animals!  A true surprise.  I had gone to Svalbard sure the polar bear was easily the ‘trophy’ species, but the all-out character of the walruses won the group of us over.  It was great getting the chance to study these massive, blubber rich beauties (beauties used loosely there), and take some pretty (pretty used loosely there) great images.

 

To join me on safari, click here!

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